Authorities: experts in a given field who offer specialized knowledge
Recognizing basic literary and rhetorical devices in formal arguments will contribute greatly to your success in this course. Test your ability to identify common devices used in these selected passages.Part 1Review the terms and definitions.Select Next to continue.Part 2For each passage, select the correct term from the drop-down menu.
  • Select Next to continue.
  • Correct.
    Basic Terms
    Narration: storytelling
    Select the i button before beginning the activity.
    Anecdote: a short account of a particular event or incident
    i
    Five canons of rhetoric: invention, delivery, arrangement, voice or style, memory
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    Part 1 of 2
    x
    Next
    Allusion: a reference to some public knowledge from history, current events, popular culture, religion, or literature
    Voice or style
    Somalia
    "The moon is gently orange with a thin, star-white bottom; its dark top disappears into the blackness surrounding it." —Ed Bell, "Lunar Eclipse"
    Recognizing basic literary and rhetorical devices in formal arguments will contribute greatly to your success in this course. Test your ability to identify common devices used in these selected passages.Part 1Review the terms and definitions.Select Next to continue.Part 2For each passage, select the correct term from the drop-down menu.
  • Select Next to continue.
  • Invention
    "Or your mood ring turns orange so you can climb into your Geo Metro and head to Wal-Mart for aspirin but instead find yourself reaching for St. John’s wort." —Barcley Owens, "The Origin of Rhubarb"
    Narration
    Choose One
    Martin Grove farmed the fields of northwestern Ohio for decades. He had fields of corn, wheat, and soybeans, and he developed a healthy orchard of apples…the best around, according to locals. In fact, in the summer of ’68, Jerry Foster announced at the town jubilee that, next to Grove’s apples, his own apples were fit for birds only. (And some say that the old saying, "that’s for the birds," comes from Foster’s proclamation.)
    Part 2 of 2
    A writer's choice of how to present an argument through unique language that is appropriate for the situation and audience.
    Allusion
    v
    Statement
    The discovery and development phase of persuasive writing in which the writer gathers evidence and selects support strategies based on the needs of the audience.
    Anecdote
    Argument
    Authorities
    "Because of light pollution, some people have never seen a dark sky. 'In most cities, there’s little point in gazing at the sky…unless you’re fascinated by the sight of a few stars and some airplanes against a glowing background,' says David Tennenbaum, a science health and environment writer (ABCNEWS.com, Technology Review, Bio-Science, Environmental Health Perspectives, American Health, and other publications.)" —Ed Bell, "Lunar Eclipse"
    Recognizing basic literary and rhetorical devices in formal arguments will contribute greatly to your success in this course. Test your ability to identify common devices used in these selected passages.Part 1Review the terms and definitions.Select Next to continue.Part 2For each passage, select the correct term from the drop-down menu.
  • Select Next to continue.
  • Voice or style
    Invention
    Narration
    Allusion
    Authorities
    Anecdote
    Reset Activity
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